The King Has Come

ST-christmas-star-2011

Introduction:  Several weeks ago you went into the attic or basement, searched through all the mess so you could spend the day after Thanksgiving fiddling with tangled cords, ladders, and frosty the snowman decorations.  The end result was going to be marvelous. Clark Griswold would be proud as you plugged in the lights expecting a glorious light display to be the envy of the neighborhood. Except one of the lights was out and so you had to spend the rest of the day trying to figure out which one it was.   You spent weeks looking for the perfect gift fighting off traffic to all the stores, only to find out that your brother bought the same gift. Then there are the office parties, the kids’ musicals, the in-laws and the outlaws. Wow, no wonder Elvis sang Blue Christmas.   Then just as all the anticipation leading up Christmas was building the Holiday came and went before you could even blink your eyes.   The vacation is over and you’re back to work on Monday.  For many people the days after the holidays can also be blue.   Do a quick internet search for post-holiday blues and you will find a ton of news articles addressing this “condition”. WebMD.com, the popular panic-inducing website that can convince you that your headache is a brain tumor, even has it listed as a medical condition. Thanks to a psychology professor in the United Kingdom there is an even official clinical-sounding name: acute post-bank holiday depression syndrome. Something tells me if you call in sick with that excuse Monday you might also come down with “acute looking-for-a-new-job syndrome.” So Christmas is over… now what?   I want us to look at what followed the first Christmas for the cure for the post-holiday blues. We will be able to see how the birth of Christ either brings much celebration or much sorrow.   As you read Matthew 2 you will see three things: A King has Come, A War has been Waged, and The Victory is Certain.

Matthew 2: 1 Now after Jesus was born in Bethlehem of Judea in the days of Herod the king, behold, wise men from the east came to Jerusalem, saying, “Where is he who has been born king of the Jews? For we saw his star when it rose and have come to worship him.” When Herod the king heard this, he was troubled, and all Jerusalem with him; and assembling all the chief priests and scribes of the people, he inquired of them where the Christ was to be born. They told him, “In Bethlehem of Judea, for so it is written by the prophet:

“‘And you, O Bethlehem, in the land of Judah,
    are by no means least among the rulers of Judah;
for from you shall come a ruler
    who will shepherd my people Israel.’”

Then Herod summoned the wise men secretly and ascertained from them what time the star had appeared. And he sent them to Bethlehem, saying, “Go and search diligently for the child, and when you have found him, bring me word, that I too may come and worship him.” After listening to the king, they went on their way. And behold, the star that they had seen when it rose went before them until it came to rest over the place where the child was. 10 When they saw the star, they rejoiced exceedingly with great joy. 11 And going into the house they saw the child with Mary his mother, and they fell down and worshiped him. Then, opening their treasures, they offered him gifts, gold and frankincense and myrrh. 12 And being warned in a dream not to return to Herod, they departed to their own country by another way.

13 Now when they had departed, behold, an angel of the Lord appeared to Joseph in a dream and said, “Rise, take the child and his mother, and flee to Egypt, and remain there until I tell you, for Herod is about to search for the child, to destroy him.” 14 And he rose and took the child and his mother by night and departed to Egypt 15 and remained there until the death of Herod. This was to fulfill what the Lord had spoken by the prophet, “Out of Egypt I called my son.”

16 Then Herod, when he saw that he had been tricked by the wise men, became furious, and he sent and killed all the male children in Bethlehem and in all that region who were two years old or under, according to the time that he had ascertained from the wise men. 17 Then was fulfilled what was spoken by the prophet Jeremiah:

18 “A voice was heard in Ramah,
    weeping and loud lamentation,
Rachel weeping for her children;
    she refused to be comforted, because they are no more.”

19 But when Herod died, behold, an angel of the Lord appeared in a dream to Joseph in Egypt, 20 saying, “Rise, take the child and his mother and go to the land of Israel, for those who sought the child’s life are dead.” 21 And he rose and took the child and his mother and went to the land of Israel. 22 But when he heard that Archelaus was reigning over Judea in place of his father Herod, he was afraid to go there, and being warned in a dream he withdrew to the district of Galilee. 23 And he went and lived in a city called Nazareth, so that what was spoken by the prophets might be fulfilled, that he would be called a Nazarene.

  1. The King Has Come

The first thing we see in this passage is the birth of a king. Contrary to the Christmas song “We Three Kings,” the wise men were not kings, but priests or court advisers similar to Daniel in the Older Testament. They were probably from Mesopotamia, the region of ancient Babylon. These men had seen the signs in the stars and being from the region of ancient Babylon they may have been aware of the prophecies of Daniel regarding the messiah.   They thus came looking for the birth of a king. Notice they don’t ask Herod if a King had been born.   They were certain that a king had been born. They were only uncertain on the location.   So which king were they looking for and why is the birth of this king so important?   To get this answer we need to go back to the beginning.

In the beginning, God created the heavens and the earth.   Then on the 6th day He created man and woman.   Genesis 1:26 says He created them in His image.   This little phrase “In his image” also called “the imago Dei“ packs a powerful punch but what exactly does it mean? For centuries, theologians have debated precisely what it means to be “the image of God”. On one hand it means that human life has dignity and we reflect something of the nature of God in our lives. Some recent scholarship has helped shed some light on the phrase. Comparing this phrase to other Ancient Near East documents we find the concept of “image” to be about representation.   The one bearing the image of a king or ruler is given authority as a representative of the king.  The “image of God” in Genesis is probably best thought of as God designating or calling human beings to be his representatives or agents in the world. The Image of God involves royalty and representing God’s kingship over the creation.   And that is what we find in Genesis 1.   God makes man in His image so that they can take dominion over the creation.  They are to be his royal representative in the world. However in Genesis 3, Man rebels against God and decides instead of being the loyal subject and representative of God, Man would rather be God himself.   Man disobeys God and in the process distorts the purpose of his creation.   Instead of ruling as God’s vice-regent, Adam and Eve give in to sin and thrust all of humanity into enslavement to sin.   The world is given over to a curse so that sin and Satan will rule instead.   In Genesis 3 as God gives out the punishment curses to Adam and Eve, he also makes a promise that one day, the seed of the woman will defeat the serpent.

The story unfolds in Genesis and evil reigns in the hearts of men.   God however continues to promise that one day evil will be defeated and creation restored.  God is in control and evil will not win.  God makes a promise with Noah to save him from the flood.   He then makes a covenant with Abraham that one day his descendents would be as numerous as the stars in the sky and as countless as the grains of sand.   There are not many things more beautiful than some of the beaches in the Philippines where my wife is from.

Most beautiful Philippine wallpaper The ocean water is a clear blue that just enticingly invites you to dive in. The trees are green and ripe with coconuts exactly like what you image when think of a tropical paradise.   And the sand…. pure white.   It’s like a post card. Some of the beaches here in America are beautiful as well.   Alright who’s up for a beach trip? My only complaint about the beach trips I have taken is that it never fails that someone wants to bury me in the sand.  I must look like someone just begging to be buried up to my neck in sand.  Here is a picture of one such trip many years ago. me at beach

It makes for a cute picture but the problem is you are digging out sand from all parts of your body for weeks.   Just after I pull the millionth grain of sand out of my hair there is another in its place.  Abraham is promised a number of descendents more numerous than the grains of sand.  What a promise!

God keeps his promise to Abraham and a great nation of people are descended from him.  Israel is told that they are to be a nation of priests.   In 2 Samuel, God promises one of the descendents of Abraham, David, that one from his family will reign forever . God says to him “When your days are fulfilled and you lie down with your fathers, I will raise up your offspring after you, who shall come from your body, and I will establish his kingdom.  He shall build a house for my name, and I will establish the throne of his kingdom forever. I will be to him a father, and he shall be to me a son.  And your house and your kingdom shall be made sure forever before me. Your throne shall be established forever.’”

Thus the promise of a coming King was continually made over and over again to the people of Israel.   God constantly pointed the people to one whose coming would defeat sin and bring in a kingdom of peace and glory forever.  Psalm 2 in particular reveals that God’s anointed will be given dominion over all nations and peoples while the rulers of the earth are warned to follow after this King or be crushed.

Even with these promises the people of Israel fell into sin and idolatry throughout the older testament.   God sent prophets to warn them that they would be punished for their sin.  Even in the midst of the message of judgment, the prophets also foretold of a king to come who will set things right.    Isaiah, one of these prophets, has this beautiful passage foretelling of the king.

Isaiah 9:6-8 For to us a child is born,
to us a son is given;
and the government shall be upon his shoulder,
and his name shall be called
Wonderful Counselor, Mighty God,
Everlasting Father, Prince of Peace.
Of the increase of his government and of peace
there will be no end,
on the throne of David and over his kingdom,
to establish it and to uphold it
with justice and with righteousness
from this time forth and forevermore.
The zeal of the Lord of hosts will do this.

The prophets call Israel to repent go unheeded however and Israel is taken captive to Babylon because of their sins.   But even in captivity God does not forget his people and continues to promises them a coming King.   The prophet Daniel, one of the few who were faithful and obedient to God, was taken captive to Babylon.   In the book of Daniel, God reveals much about the coming king.   Here are just a few instances of the promise to Daniel of the coming King:

Daniel 2:44 And in the days of those kings the God of heaven will set up a kingdom that shall never be destroyed, nor shall the kingdom be left to another people. It shall break in pieces all these kingdoms and bring them to an end, and it shall stand forever,

Daniel 4:3 How great are his signs, how mighty his wonders! His kingdom is an everlasting kingdom, and his dominion endures from generation to generation.

Daniel 7:14 And to him was given dominion and glory and a kingdom, that all peoples, nations, and languages should serve him; his dominion is an everlasting dominion, which shall not pass away, and his kingdom one that shall not be destroyed.

Daniel 7:18 But the saints of the Most High shall receive the kingdom and possess the kingdom forever, forever and ever.’

Daniel was also given a vision that revealed exactly when this King would come. In Daniel 9, the exact amount of years is given for when the Messiah will appear. These prophesies build and point toward to this King who would save his people from their sin and who would bring Joy to the world. Then the Older Testament ends. And the years count down.

And now we are back to Matthew 2.   The wise men are here and looking for a King.   The timeline given to Daniel has come to a head.   The King, the anointed one, is born.   And with the King comes the dawning of the Kingdom.  Kingdom is the primary theme of the book of Matthew.  It is also the major theme of Jesus’ teaching as well.   The term “Kingdom of God or heaven” occurs twenty-four times in Matthew , fourteen times in Mark, thirty-two times in Luke, twice in the Gospel of John , six times in Acts, eight times in Paul, and once in Revelation .

What then does the Kingdom of God or Kingdom of Heaven mean?   First of all the Bible everywhere assumes that our Father is sovereign over the universe but this is not the concept the “kingdom of God” has in mind. More precisely, the kingdom of God refers to the visible, universal submission to His reign. As we have already stated , Adam’s sin plunged mankind into rebellion against its Creator. Yet the Lord’s prophets predicted a day when all creation would again recognize Yahweh’s authority and bow the knee to the appointed king.

The Jews however didn’t understand what this kingdom meant.   They were looking for a political and military leader who would establish a country with borders and armies.    Mark Rushdoony does an excellent job of explaining the Kingdom of God:

“Man cannot see the future, only the present and, to a limited extent, the past. He thus envisions the future within the limitations of past experience. It is no wonder the Jews expected a very political and Jewish kingdom, given their centuries of experience with a Davidic king in Jerusalem.   Unfortunately though the prophesies God gave his people pointed to the coming King being something much greater than just an earthly kingdom, the Jews including the disciples had a hard time understanding the kingdom as something more.

The Kingdom of God and its King Jesus would not be limited by the past-bound assumption of Jewish thought. His Kingdom would not be a Jewish state confined to borders on a map, but a heavenly government, a godly order. Jesus would not merely usher in religious reform. His work was to destroy the work of Satan, to crush the serpent, to atone for sin as the Lamb of God, and to bring men of all nations from darkness to light. Jesus came to do more than bring restoration and blessing to Jews. He came to bring salvation to all. Israel was always meant to include people of all nations. Jesus came to bring salvation to Jew and Gentile, to reconcile men of all nations and tongues to God. The kingdom of God would stretch over the entire world.

Jesus came to do more than bless Israel: he came to bless a new, enlarged Israel, all those made part of the covenant family by the grace of the heavenly Father. The blessing was not limited to those of Jewish blood but it was, as promised to Abraham, a blessing to all nations of the earth.”

The Lord’s chosen king is the Messiah, Jesus. Unfortunately, many Christians incorrectly believe that His kingdom has nothing to do with the present, something that comes only at “the end of time” with great natural disasters. Attempts to see the Kingdom of God as only a future event are mostly the product of a late nineteenth century.

“The Gospels tell us the Kingdom is to be sought in our lives, to be received now , that a man in Christ’s day could see it and enter into it, and that it is found among us. . . Other passages refer to the Kingdom as a progressive, developing fact. The Lord’s Prayer petitions “Thy kingdom come,” whereas we are told that “the kingdom of God is come” and that it is on earth and in heaven. Many of the parables regarding the Kingdom describe it in terms of the growth of a seed, tree, or yeast that develops over a period of time.”

His second coming is the consummation of His present reign, for He actually inaugurated the kingdom of God during His first advent. There is no denying that many references to the Kingdom are in the future as well. It is described as existing at the end of the world and after the final judgment. The angelic messenger told Mary it would have “no end” and the Epistles refer to it as “an everlasting kingdom” that is “forever and ever.” We Christians are the heralds of this kingdom. By the power of the Holy Spirit, we bear witness to our King, and through our obedience the Father will call people to worship Him. Thus, His kingdom increases in its visibility.

“God is greater than man’s mind can imagine. The Kingdom of God described in the New Testament is far more glorious than the one pictured by the Jews and even by Christ’s disciples. It is all they imagined but in a more extensive power and glory.”

When Jesus taught us to pray, He told us to ask for God’s kingdom to come. It is easy to pray a laundry list of requests for health, safety, and other provisions. But how many of us spend time in concentrated prayer that all peoples would submit to God and obey His Law?

The king was born and the wise men knew it. But we see in our passage that so did the enemy.   Sometimes it seems when read some of the stories in the bible that the enemy is more aware of the implications of Jesus coming then the others.   We see here that King Herod knew the implications of Christ’s coming and thus a War was Waged.

II. A WAR IS WAGED

Herod, interestingly enough was not a Jew but an Idumean, a descendant of Esau by ancestry.   But because of his connections with Rome, Herod was appointed “king of the Jews,” though his command was not secured until after a series of military victories which was consummated by the capture of Jerusalem in 37 B.C. One of his chief accomplishments was the remodeling of the dilapidated Jewish temple, a project which was not completed until A.D. 62/64, only a few years before that temple was destroyed by the providence of God.   Even though he started work on rebuilding the temple he also built many monuments to his own name.   He was a ruthless dictator.   Other than being called Herod “ the great”, which one wonders if he didn’t give himself that name, he has also been called “a madman who murdered his own family and a great many rabbis”,”the evil genius of the Judean nation”, and one who was “prepared to commit any crime in order to gratify his unbounded ambition”.     There was a saying that it was better to be Herod’s swine than his own son.   Indeed, He killed three of his own son’s including one just 5 days before his own death.   Herod also gave orders that upon his own death several well liked citizens of Judah were to be executed so that if the people would not mourn his death they would still mourn none the less.   When we come to Matthew 2 we see that Herod continues to act in the same evil way.

The wise men come to Herod speaking of the king to come.   Herod’s own officials know the prophecies and yet Herod seems to think that he can destroy and defeat God’s anointed one.   We see here that enemy of God understands what the coming of Jesus means.   It means the end of the rule of evil.   See Herod was ruling by his own wisdom and not by God’s.  He knew that the coming of Jesus would mean the end of his rule.   The coming of Jesus means that sin, darkness, and rebellion will rein no more on this earth.   The coming of Jesus meant that a new authority was here and that Jesus must be obeyed.

As the Kingdom comes, darkness puts up a fight. It is a failing last-ditch effort.   Herod first tries to be sly and cunning but ultimately reveals his true evil in putting to death the children of Bethlehem.     Matthew in verse 18 points to a prophecy of Jeremiah which shows that amount of sorrow felt by the evil of Herod.   We will look a little closer at this prophecy in a bit but for now we will see that the coming of Jesus brings war.

And the war continues even though Jesus has already defeated the enemy on the cross.   The enemy has been trying to wipe out Jesus ever since.   And if the enemy cannot wipe out Jesus, the enemy will lash out at the Church.   Why is this?   Again, the enemy fights because the coming of Jesus means something.   It means that Jesus is King and must be obeyed.   This means that all nations, all governments, and all rulers are answerable to Jesus. The early church knew this. One of the earliest creeds of Christians was “Jesus is Lord” which means Caesar is not.  They refused to bow to human rulers and the enemy hated this.   We need to reclaim this understanding of the Lordship of Christ. Abraham Kupyer says it this way “There is not a square inch in the whole domain of our human existence over which Christ, who is Sovereign over all, does not cry, Mine!” This means that the Kingdom of God, and the Lordship of Christ affects all aspects of our life.   Our faith is not something that we just have at church or in the privacy of our homes.   Jesus doesn’t just want an hour on Sunday morning.   He wants 24 hour devotion 7 days a week.   This means that God’s word should rule our lives Sunday to Saturday.   God’s word affects how we work, how we raise our families, how we spend our money, how we spend our time, what we watch, what we think, how we vote, how we think about marriage, love, life, and so forth.

In our culture just as then this is a dangerous message.   Why?   Because the human heart wants to rebel against God and wants no part in his rule. So our culture tells us we can practice our religion if we just keep it to ourselves.  If you watch the news often you will notice politicians have recently started using a new phrase and stopped using an older phrase.   President Obama along with others has started using the phrase “Freedom to worship as you chose” instead of “free exercise of religion.”   It may seem like these are just interchangeable but they are not.   The constitutionally guaranteed free exercise of religion in America extends well beyond the freedom to worship. It includes the freedom to live out our conscientiously held beliefs even in the public realm.  Worship on the other hand is seen as essentially a private and personal process, a communion between God and an individual. No government could restrict such worship, any more than it could monitor and censor every citizen’s thoughts and prayers. Even forbidding individuals to worship together in public, which coercive communist governments like China’s have done, cannot actually prevent individuals from worshiping God in private. So a law that merely protected the freedom to worship would hardly be worth heralding in a presidential proclamation.   But it is this change of wording and thus meaning that is gaining acceptance in our culture.   You are free to believe what you like but keep your trap shut about it.

Here is the thing however, our King Jesus was not quiet and we as Christians are not commanded or allowed by Him to be quiet. Jesus is Lord over all people and governments.   The early church knew this and so did the Roman emperors and that is why they put them to death.   Yet the early church did not give up or give in. They remained strong and eventually it was the Roman Empire which fell and Christianity reigned supreme.

Again, the reason that Herod wants to kill Jesus is the same reason that the enemy is trying to shut up Christians today.   The reason that atheists want to take down the Ten Commandments at the courthouse and remove the nativity display is not because they have a problem with stone displays or a cute baby in a manger. If the nativity was nothing more than a cute baby in a manger then we would see them everywhere. The problem is the cute baby didn’t stay a baby but grew up and demands obedience from the entire world.   The cute baby is king and has given His law in the Bible and demands that all live by it.   All governments and people are commanded to obey and follow God. And the enemy is rebelling against that.

This leads us to our third and last point. The Victory is Certain.

III.   The Victory is Certain.

The victory is certain because our God is sovereign over all things and all of history.   Look at our passage again. We see four ways that God’s sovereignty is shown. First, God is in control of nature.   The wise men saw the signs in the heaven and the star that pointed them to the birth of Jesus.  Our God controls the heavens.  It is nothing for him to put a new star in place.  It is nothing for Jesus to control the winds and the waves.   All of creation is at his control.   Secondly, God even controls dreams. We see from this passage that both the wise men and Joseph were warned in dreams.   God has complete control over dreams.   That is a pretty cool thing to think about.   There are even stories today of people in closed countries who have not had access to the gospel having dreams where they are told to seek out a missionary.   You can do an internet search and there are several recent articles about Muslims in Iraq or Iran having dreams where Jesus appears to them and tells them to seek out a missionary. God is sovereign and in control of dreams.

Thirdly I want you to notice in this passage how many times that Matthew writes that something happened to fulfill scripture.  Matthew growing up as a devout Jew was very familiar with the scriptures.  He is writing his Gospel for a Jewish audience to show them how Jesus is the promised Messiah. So Matthew often works to show how the events of Jesus life fulfill the Old Testament Scripture.   We see then that God is sovereign in that all the circumstances of this story have been planned out by God way in advance.   In particular look at verses 14 and 15.   Joseph takes Jesus and Mary to Egypt and Matthew writes that this fulfills what the prophet said, “Out of Egypt I called my son.”   This is a very interesting phrase.   It comes from Hosea

Hosea 11:1 When Israel was a child, then I loved him; and, though I loved him, I suffered him to be a great while in Egypt; but, because I loved him, in due time I called him out of Egypt.”

Hosea is referring of course to the time when the people of Israel went to Egypt to escape a famine and  became slaves.   You will remember how Moses led the people of Israel out of Egypt and took them to the Promised Land.   So exactly how is this verse in Hosea a prophecy about Jesus.  Kevin DeYoung explains:

“How can Matthew say this flight to Egypt fulfilled the words of the prophet Hosea when the two events seem connected by no more than the word Egypt? How can this possibly be a fulfillment of Old Testament prophecy? The first step toward understanding Matthew’s purpose is to look more carefully at the word “fulfill.” The Greek word is pleroō. And it simply means to fill up. That’s what Matthew is at pains to demonstrate–that Jesus was filling up the Old Testament. Sometimes this meant very specifically that the Old Testament predicted the Messiah’s birthplace would be in Bethlehem and Jesus was, in fact, born in Bethlehem. There you go. That’s fulfillment. But fulfillment can be broader than that. It can refer to the filling up of the Old Testament; that is, the bringing to light what previously had been in shadows. And this is what Matthew has in mind.

So what exactly is Jesus fulfilling, or filling up in Matthew 2:15? Jesus, as Matthew correctly understands the situation, is filling up the redemptive historical purposes of the nation. In other words, Matthew can claim that this Hosea passage, which talks about the Exodus of Israel out of Egypt, is fulfilled in Jesus, because Jesus is the embodiment of Israel.”

This is important because it shows the sovereignty of God in History. This means that all the events of the Old Testament, the history of Israel, ever detail happened as God planned so as to point to Jesus.   God is control of the smallest detail.   Nothing is outside of his reach.   And because of God’s sovereignty over History we can be confident that the victory over evil is more than sure.

Fourthly, God is sovereign over his enemies.   They think they are raging against him. They think they are sneaky and wise. They think their plans catch him off guard.   But they are nothing more than pawns. For every move they make God is ten ahead of them.   See first how Herod’s plan to kill the infants again fulfills scripture. Verse 17 says this fulfills a prophecy from Jeremiah. Look at the prophecy of Jeremiah:

Jeremiah 31:15- 17; 31-34 Thus says the LORD: “A voice is heard in Ramah, lamentation and bitter weeping. Rachel is weeping for her children; she refuses to be comforted for her children, because they are no more.” Thus says the LORD “Keep your voice from weeping, and your eyes from tears, for there is a reward for your work, declares the LORD, and they shall come back from the land of the enemy. There is hope for your future, declares the LORD. . .Behold, the days are coming, declares the LORD, when I will make a new covenant with the house of Israel and the house of Judah,  not like the covenant that I made with their fathers on the day when I took them by the hand to bring them out of the land of Egypt, my covenant that they broke, though I was their husband, declares the LORD. For this is the covenant that I will make with the house of Israel after those days, declares the LORD: I will put my law within them, and I will write it on their hearts. And I will be their God, and they shall be my people.  And no longer shall each one teach his neighbor and each his brother, saying, ‘Know the LORD,’ for they shall all know me, from the least of them to the greatest, declares the LORD. For I will forgive their iniquity, and I will remember their sin no more.

Even the evil put forth by Herod points to the glory of Jesus. Even though there was great sorrow due to Herod’s evil there would be great rejoicing because of the King.

Herod tried to destroy Christmas but yet the birth of Christ still brings joy.   It is as the Grinch found out when he tried to destroy Christmas.  It can not be defeated.

But this sound wasn’t sad!
Why, this sound sounded glad!

Every Who down in Whoville, the tall and the small,
Was singing without any presents at all!

He hadn’t stopped Christmas from coming! It came!
Somehow or other, it came just the same!

And the Grinch, with his grinch feet ice-cold in the snow,
Stood puzzling and puzzling. “How could it be so?

The enemy cannot defeat Jesus. But Jesus does defeat the enemy. Notice how in verse 19 it simply says “when Herod died. “   The enemy is defeated in this story and it is simply an afterthought.   We know from history that Herod the great died from a horrible disease and it was a painful violent death.   A recent article describes his death: “More than 2,000 years after Herod the Great succumbed at age 69, doctors have now settled on exactly what killed the king of ancient Judea: chronic kidney disease complicated by a very uncomfortable case of maggot-infested gangrene of the genitals”

Evil met its match. God is sovereign and thus the victory is secure.  This is good news.  The birth of Christ brings real joy to the world.   A savior is born and his kingdom shall never end.   The good news is that not only has Herod been defeated but Satan and sin have been defeated.   The good news is that God has made a way for people of all nations to be a part of the Kingdom of God.   You and I are invited to the Kingdom of God and this is a kingdom without end.

So as we close there are really two responses to this message.   Will you be like the wise men who bowed their heads in worship of the King of King?   Will you submit to the Lordship of Jesus? The Bible says to enter the Kingdom of God you must be born again.   You must repent of your sins and put your faith in Jesus Christ.   Will you be like the wise men?

Or will you be like Herod?   Will you see the King of Kings and determine that it is a threat to your own self-rule? Will you decide that you prefer to be king and you will continue to rebel?

Finally if you are already a part of the kingdom of God then know that this is a kingdom that will never be defeated.   This does not mean however that things in this life will always be rainbows and bubble gum. In fact many have been called to lay down their lives for the kingdom.   When the book of Revelation says that we will overcome by the blood of the lamb and the word of our testimony it is referring to the testimony of many whose heads were cut off and lives ended.   Yet these saints stood strong believing that the Kingdom of God would one day fill the entire earth.   They knew that God would use their sacrifice.     And God still calls us to sacrifice and living full on for his Kingdom.   We are not called to be the last outpost of a retreating army waiting on the rescue ship to take them out of this world.   Instead we are sent to be the army taking the battle to the world.   We do this not with weapons of this world but with the word of God and the weapons of the Spirit. God enlarges the kingdom through us as we share the gospel with our coworkers, as we teach our child about the love of God, as we help the helpless and speak out against evil.   And the Bible promises that these efforts will be honored by God as the Kingdom grows.

This is what Christmas is about. The Joy of Christmas is not over even though the Christmas lights have been taken down and the songs have stopped playing.   The Joy of Christmas continues all year.

The King has Come, the War has been Waged, and the Victory is Sure.   Will you be born again today?

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